Toasts

 

Tyler's Toast

 
       

The Craftsmenís work of day is done, the Brethren now must part.
"A Tylerís Toast" our Master cries, "to warm each faithful heart."
For though we go our separate ways, our bond is ever strong.
The magic of the mystic tie will draw us back ere long.

Until then, think, each time you meet a Brother down on luck,
Whose life is marked by poverty, perhaps by illness struck.
That "If not for the Grace of God, I might walk in his shoes,
I wonder how much I can spare, to help him meet his dues."

And spare a wish for Brethren, who through no fault, their own,
May find themselves in foreign lands, and labouring alone.
That once the day shall come when they no longer need to roam,
May each enjoy a swift and happy voyage to his home.

Long may our Lodges welcome Craftsmen, travelling to the East.
And may our secrets guide good hearts, until each soulís release
To wing its own way Heav'nward, these heartfelt words ingrain,
We're happy to meet, sorry to part, happy to meet again.

To our next merry meeting.

 

by Iain Macdonald

 
 

 

     

To all poor and distressed Masons, wherever dispersed over the face of Earth and Water, wishing them a speedy relief from all their sufferings, and a safe return to their native country; should they so desire it.

 

Pocket, heart, hand
(Repeat 3 times with gestures)
Hereís to the sons of the widow
Whenever, wherever they roam
A speedy relief to their afflictions
And if they desire,
a speedy return to their home.

 
 

 

     

To all poor and distressed freemasons,
Wherever they may be,
On the land, on the sea or in the air.
A speedy relief from their afflictions,
And a safe return to their native land,
If they so desire.
(Response)
To all poor and distressed brethren.

 

To all poor and distressed brethren,
Wheresoever they may be,
On the land, the sea or in the air.
A speedy relief from their suffering,
And a safe return to their native land, If they so desire.
(Response)
To all poor and distressed brethren.

 

 
 

 

     

Then 'ereís to the sons o' the Widow,
Wherever, 'owever they roam.
'Ereís all they desire, an' if they require
A speedy return to their 'ome.

Rudyard Kipling